Tag: FDIC

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Financial Choice Act Moves to the House Floor
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FDIC and OCC Issue Final Guidance on Deposit Advance Loans
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FDIC Issues a Quick Guide for Consumers on Credit, Debit, and Prepaid Cards
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Consumer Financial Services Industry, Meet Your New Regulator

Financial Choice Act Moves to the House Floor

By Daniel F. C. CrowleyBruce J. HeimanWilliam A. KirkKarishma Shah PageMark A. Roszak and Eric A. Love

On May 4, the House Financial Services Committee (“HFSC”) concluded its three-day markup of H.R.10, the Financial Choice Act (“FCA”), a bill to reform the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank”). The HFSC reported the bill favorably to the full House by a vote of 34-26. All 19 Democratic amendments were rejected on party-line votes. Republicans did not offer any amendments but focused their efforts on raising concerns about the extent to which Dodd-Frank has stifled economic growth and put taxpayer money at risk. Committee members debated a number of the more controversial provisions of the FCA, including Title VII to restructure the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) and remove its unfair, deceptive, or abusive acts or practices (“UDAAP”) authority; Section 841 to repeal the Department of Labor’s conflict of interest-fiduciary duty rule; Section 111 to repeal the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s (“FDIC”) Orderly Liquidation Authority; Title IX to repeal the Volcker Rule; and numerous reforms to the Securities and Exchange Commission’s (“SEC”) shareholder proxy voting rules.

To read the full alert, click here.

FDIC and OCC Issue Final Guidance on Deposit Advance Loans

By: David I. Monteiro, Michael A. Cumming

Recently, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”) issued final supervisory guidance (FDIC guidance, OCC guidance) for financial institutions that offer so-called “deposit advance products.” By using these products, borrowers generally receive small-dollar, short-term loans and promise to repay them from the proceeds of their next paycheck (or benefit disbursement), which are direct-deposited into the borrower’s bank account. Notably, the regulators’ guidance applies to deposit advance products “regardless of how the extension of credit is structured” (e.g., as a loan or a line of credit). Read More

FDIC Issues a Quick Guide for Consumers on Credit, Debit, and Prepaid Cards

By: Andrew L. Caplan*
*Mr. Caplan is admitted to practice in NY (not admitted in DC); supervised by Nanci Weissgold, a member of the DC bar

As Gertrude Stein once wrote, “a rose is a rose is a rose.” However, as indicated in a recent Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) consumer guide, a card is not a card is not a card.

On March 5, 2012, the FDIC issued A Quick Guide for Consumers on Credit, Debit, and Prepaid Cards (“the Guide”) to help consumers appreciate the differences among credit cards, debit cards, and prepaid cards. As indicated in a recent FDIC press release, “[t]he guide is intended to help consumers who routinely use cards to pay for goods and services but who don’t always understand the differences in how these cards work or the applicable consumer protections.”

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Consumer Financial Services Industry, Meet Your New Regulator

By: Melanie H. Brody, Stephanie C. Robinson

The centerpiece of the Dodd-Frank Act from a consumer protection standpoint is Title X, the Consumer Financial Protection Act of 2010. The Act will create a powerful consumer financial protection watchdog, the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. The majority of existing federal consumer financial protection laws will come under the Bureau’s purview, and the Bureau will have broad authority to enforce those laws and to issue its own rules under the Act. This alert describes the Bureau, including its structure, objectives, functions, jurisdiction, rulemaking authority and enforcement powers.

To view the complete alert online, click here.

This client alert is part of a series of alerts focused on monitoring financial regulatory reform. Below is a list of other alerts in the series:

New Executive Compensation and Governance Requirements in Financial Reform Legislation – July 7, 2010

Financial Regulatory Reform – The Next Chapter: Unprecedented Rulemaking and Congressional Activity – July 7, 2010

Investor Protection Provisions of Dodd-Frank – July 1, 2010

Senate Financial Reform Bill Would Dramatically Step Up Regulation of U.S. and Non-U.S. Private Fund Advisers – June 8, 2010

Approaching the Home Stretch: Senate Passes “Restoring American Financial Stability Act of 2010” – June 8, 2010

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