Tag: usury

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Delaware’s No-Usury-Cap Rule Deemed Unenforceable as Contrary to New York Public Policy in FDCPA Class Action
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New York Campaign Against Out-of-State Online Lenders Survives a Battle in the SDNY

Delaware’s No-Usury-Cap Rule Deemed Unenforceable as Contrary to New York Public Policy in FDCPA Class Action

By Andrew C. Glass, Roger L. Smerage, and Brandon R. Dillman

The Southern District of New York recently refused to enforce Delaware’s no-usury-cap rule in a long-running Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (“FDCPA”) class action, concluding that the rule violates New York public policy. See Madden v. Midland Funding, LLC, 2017 WL 758518 (S.D.N.Y. Feb. 27, 2017). In Madden, the plaintiff claimed that the defendants charged her an interest rate in excess of the limit imposed by New York law, triggering a violation of the FDCPA. The case has a long history. We first addressed the case in a client alert after the Second Circuit determined that National Bank Act preemption does not apply to debt purchased by independent, third parties. The United States Supreme Court declined to review the Second Circuit’s decision, a ruling about which we blogged.

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New York Campaign Against Out-of-State Online Lenders Survives a Battle in the SDNY

By: David L. Beam, Christopher Shelton*
*Mr. Shelton is a law clerk and not admitted to the practice of law.

The Internet has been with us for about two decades, and financial service companies have been offering products over the Internet for nearly as long.  One would have thought that there would be final resolution by now on the question of whether, and under what circumstances, a state may regulate an online lender with no physical presence in the state.  However, this issue continues to be a thorny one.

A recent decision by the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York touches on this issue.  In Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians v. New York State Department of Financial Services, 2013 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 144656, 2013 WL 5460185 (S.D.N.Y. Sep. 30, 2013), the State of New York successfully argued that it can regulate online loans made by Native American tribes to New York residents.  The case primarily involved the question of whether a state could regulate an enterprise owned by a Native American tribe located in another state.  But the decision potentially has implications for other situations where a company offers financial services over the Internet.  Moreover, it is part of a wider campaign by New York authorities to target online lenders for alleged usury.

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