Search Results For: fannie mae

1
GSEs Release Revised Framework for Origination Defects and Remedies — The Proof Will Be in the Execution
2
CFPB Issues Guidance to Mortgage Lenders on Verifying Disability Income
3
CFPB Issues Proposed Rule to Impose Additional Reporting Requirements Under Regulation C
4
Inspector General Urges FHFA to Consider Suing Servicers, Force-Placed Insurers
5
Recent Force-Placed Insurance Initiatives by FHFA & CFPB Suggest Divergent Priorities
6
K&L Gates Webinar: Mortgage Loan Servicers and Affiliated Service Providers – What are the Rules?
7
K&L Gates Partner Laurence E. Platt Testifies before the Committee on Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs
8
CFPB Tweaks Ability to Repay Rule for Small Portfolio Creditors, Housing Assistance Programs, and Nonprofits
9
Senators Attempt to Chip Away at Housing Reform with “Jumpstart GSE Reform Act” and Budget Amendment
10
Force-Placed Insurance Standards in the Global Foreclosure Settlement

GSEs Release Revised Framework for Origination Defects and Remedies — The Proof Will Be in the Execution

By: Laurence E. Platt, Jennifer A. Overall

By recently releasing yet another revised representation and warranty framework, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac continued their efforts to assuage the concerns of the lending industry that a default by a borrower poses an unfair risk of a loan repurchase demand.  On October 7, 2015, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac (the “GSEs”), at the direction of the Federal Housing Finance Agency (“FHFA”), announced a framework for  origination defects and remedies (the “Framework”) that expands on existing frameworks governing the rights and responsibilities of lenders that sell or securitize loans to or with the GSEs.  For example, permitting repricing or cure in lieu of the remedy of repurchase represents a concession by the GSEs.  Nevertheless, the language of the new Framework is ambiguous enough that one may have to rely on the GSEs’ apparent spirit of good intentions rather than the precision of their language to take total comfort in the changes.

To read the full alert, click here.

CFPB Issues Guidance to Mortgage Lenders on Verifying Disability Income

By: Melanie Brody, Stephanie C. Robinson, Jay M. Willis

On Tuesday, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB” or the “Bureau”) issued a compliance bulletin, CFPB Bulletin 2014-03, to help lenders avoid discrimination against recipients of Social Security Administration (“SSA”) disability income in violation of the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and its implementing regulation, Regulation B.

Creditors may occasionally feel stuck between a rock and a hard place when underwriting mortgage loans for disability income recipients. On the one hand, creditors have a legal obligation to ensure that applicants are able to repay any credit extended. When an applicant receives public assistance, Regulation B expressly allows creditors to consider the length of time that such assistance is likely to continue. On the other hand, while SSA provides recipients with disability benefits documentation, that documentation generally does not detail how long benefits will last. Creditors seeking to responsibly underwrite mortgage loans must somehow make that determination on their own.

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CFPB Issues Proposed Rule to Impose Additional Reporting Requirements Under Regulation C

By: Melanie Brody, Stephanie C. Robinson, Jay M. Willis

On Friday, the CFPB released a proposed rule that would significantly expand the scope of financial institutions’ mortgage lending data reporting requirements under the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, or HMDA.

First enacted in 1975, HMDA was originally intended to allow both regulators and the public at large to examine whether lenders were effectively serving the credit needs of the communities in which those lenders were located. To that end, the Act required covered institutions to collect and publicly disclose data regarding their mortgage lending activities, thus allowing both public officials and the mortgage lending industry the means necessary to respond to areas of need. Subsequent amendments to the Act, designed to assist regulators in monitoring compliance with fair lending laws, required that covered financial institutions also report the race, ethnicity, sex, and annual income of both applicants and borrowers for home mortgage loans (and mortgage loans purchased by the institution). Read More

Inspector General Urges FHFA to Consider Suing Servicers, Force-Placed Insurers

By: Nanci L. Weissgold, Kerri M. Smith, * Christopher Shelton
* Mr. Shelton is not admitted in D.C. Supervised by Nanci Weissgold, member of D.C. Bar.

On June 25, 2014, the inspector general of the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) issued a report on force-placed insurance with only one recommendation: FHFA should consider suing servicers and force-placed insurers for hundreds of millions of dollars in allegedly “excessive” force-placed insurance premiums.

As we discussed in a recent blog post, “force-placed” or “lender-placed” insurance is an area of increasing controversy, with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac rolling out new restrictions on perceived conflicts of interest between insurers and the servicers that bring them business. The inspector general noted these reforms going forward, but believes that FHFA should also assess how to pursue perceived past abuses. Read More

Recent Force-Placed Insurance Initiatives by FHFA & CFPB Suggest Divergent Priorities

By: Nanci L. Weissgold, *Christopher Shelton
* Mr. Shelton is not admitted in D.C. Supervised by Nanci Weissgold, member of D.C. Bar.

Force-placed insurance is under continuing scrutiny by the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). However, each agency’s focus is slightly different. FHFA, perhaps galvanized by a New York enforcement action, has focused on conflicts of interest between servicers and insurers. The CFPB has focused on erroneous placing of insurance and excessive charges. Read More

K&L Gates Webinar: Mortgage Loan Servicers and Affiliated Service Providers – What are the Rules?

By: Holly Spencer Bunting, Kristie D. Kully,  Kerri M. Smith, Nanci L. Weissgold

No one said it was going to be easy to be a servicer of residential mortgage loans.

The current scrutiny of servicing practices is at a fever pitch. Recently, one focus of federal and state officials has been on enforcing the broad array of laws, regulations, and other requirements applicable to a servicer’s engagement of affiliated service providers. In particular, regulators are increasingly interested in the reliance by servicers upon affiliated service providers, and the perception that the servicer may have conflicts of interest or is self-dealing. In fact, regulators such as New York State Department of Financial Services Superintendent Benjamin Lawsky are becoming significant obstacles to the transfer of mortgage servicing rights in certain cases, probing into compliance failures in past servicing practices and potential conflicts of interest with affiliated service providers. Read More

K&L Gates Partner Laurence E. Platt Testifies before the Committee on Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs

By: Laurence E. Platt

Larry Platt testified at a hearing held by the Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday, October 29, considering standards for mortgage loan servicers, particularly in connection with loss mitigation activities. The hearing was one of several designed to examine housing finance reform and the essentials of a functioning housing finance system in the Committee’s continuing deliberations over the fate of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and other provisions in the proposed Housing Finance Reform and Taxpayer Protection Act of 2013. Read More

CFPB Tweaks Ability to Repay Rule for Small Portfolio Creditors, Housing Assistance Programs, and Nonprofits

By: Kristie D. Kully , Andrew L. Caplan

On May 29, 2013, the CFPB finalized certain amendments to its January 2013 Ability to Repay/Qualified Mortgage Rule. In addition to clarifying how loan originator compensation will be factored into the QM’s three percent limit on points and fees (as discussed in a recent K&L Gates Consumer Financial Services Watch blog post), the May 2013 amendments (which will become effective at the same time as the QM Rule, in January 2014) will exempt new categories of creditors and transactions from the Rule’s ability to repay requirements; expand the definition of QM to include a new set of loans made by small portfolio lenders; and create a two-year window in which certain balloon payment loans will enjoy QM status, without requiring that such loans be made to borrowers in rural or underserved areas. Read More

Senators Attempt to Chip Away at Housing Reform with “Jumpstart GSE Reform Act” and Budget Amendment

By: Kristie D. Kully, Andrew L. Caplan

Senators Bob Corker (R-TN), Mark Warner (D-VA), David Vitter (R-LA), and Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) have introduced legislation that, if enacted, may make a partial dent in the U.S. housing reform effort. The “Jumpstart GSE Reform Act” (the “Legislation”), introduced on March 14 in the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs (the “Senate Banking Committee”), would prevent any increase in guarantee fees (“g-fees”) imposed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac (the “GSEs”) from offsetting other government spending. The Legislation would also prohibit the sale of GSE preferred stock by the United States Treasury (the “Treasury”) without Congressional approval and structural housing finance reform. Furthermore, on March 22, Senator Tim Johnson (D-SD), chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, offered a bipartisan amendment (the “Amendment”) to the Senate budget that would prohibit Congress from using g-fee increases to offset additional government spending. The Amendment was agreed to in the Senate by unanimous consent. Although this budget will not become law, the Amendment shows growing support for this issue. Read More

Force-Placed Insurance Standards in the Global Foreclosure Settlement

By: Steven M. Kaplan, Rebecca Lobenherz

Force-placing insurance could be a hazardous practice if not done appropriately. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) has made force-placed insurance a main focus of its desired mortgage servicing reforms and new rules on the issue are expected to be released by the CFPB as soon as this week. This is in addition to high-profile investigations into force-placed insurance by New York and California. Therefore, it should be no surprise that a significant section of the March 2012 Global Foreclosure Settlement lays out new force-placed insurance standards for parties to the settlement agreement. Read More

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