Archive: February 2016

1
The CFPB’s TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosures Rule
2
Webinar: The Mortgage Lifecycle: Litigation Hotspots From Origination Through Foreclosure
3
Certain Compliance Risks in Marketplace/Peer-to-Peer/Online Lending
4
CFPB and DOJ Take Further Action Against Indirect Auto Lenders

The CFPB’s TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosures Rule

From the January 2016 issue of The Review of Banking and Financial Services, with permission.

On October 3, 2015, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (“CFPB”) final rule integrating certain mortgage disclosures under the Truth in Lending Act (“TILA”) and the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (“RESPA”) went into effect. While potentially simplifying the mortgage disclosure obligations of creditors by bringing together two separate disclosure regimes, the text of the regulation, along with its Preamble and Official Interpretations (the “Commentary”), impose significant changes on the disclosures required in the residential mortgage loan origination process. Creditors have been grappling with these requirements since the regulations were finalized in November 2013, and have devoted substantial resources to updating technology, working through legal and compliance issues, testing the production of the disclosures, and training employees on the requirements of the TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosures (“TRID”). But challenges remain, and many questions are still unanswered about how certain disclosures should be made on the forms in specific loan-level scenarios. Inevitably, themes have emerged as to the issues that continue to cause concern. After providing a brief introduction to TRID, this article highlights several of these “hot” topics that are keeping compliance officers awake at night.

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Webinar: The Mortgage Lifecycle: Litigation Hotspots From Origination Through Foreclosure

Please join a group of our seasoned Financial Institutions and Services Litigation attorneys for a webinar addressing hot litigation topics concerning residential mortgages. We will begin with loan origination, navigate through loan servicing, and end with foreclosure and loan termination. Along the way, we will touch upon litigation arising from various consumer protection statutes, as well as notable common law claims. The webinar will wrap up with our thoughts on anticipated litigation trends and time for Q&A.

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Certain Compliance Risks in Marketplace/Peer-to-Peer/Online Lending

The tragic terrorist shootings in San Bernardino on December 2, 2015 shed light on serious risks associated with online marketplace lending. The attackers obtained $28,500 from an online marketplace lender under a pretext, but then allegedly used the funds to reimburse their arms dealer. This apparent link between the money lent and the mass murders led public officials to re-examine the risks associated with this new and increasingly popular method of lending.

Online marketplace lending represents a chance for investors to realize greater returns and for borrowers to refinance expensive debt and pay less interest, as technology and peer-to-peer matching/evaluation greatly reduces the overhead of the business model. Given both the widespread interest in and the potential for the misuse of such online lending platforms, federal and state lawmakers and regulators are increasing scrutiny of the industry.

CFPB and DOJ Take Further Action Against Indirect Auto Lenders

Following an investigation by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) and the Department of Justice (“DOJ”), a captive indirect auto lender agreed on February 2, 2016, to change its pricing policies and compensation systems to limit dealer discretion and financial incentives to mark up interest rates for auto purchases.

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