Archive: 10 December 2015

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What’s Driving the CFPB’s Latest Administrative Enforcement Action?

What’s Driving the CFPB’s Latest Administrative Enforcement Action?

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) latest enforcement action suggests that the CFPB may seek to use its administrative enforcement authority to pursue claims of unfair or deceptive conduct that would otherwise be time-barred and that pre-date the agency’s formation. The CFPB Director’s ultimate decision on these issues—and any court decisions that may result from any appeal—are likely to have widespread implications for the agency’s enforcement powers.

On November 18, the CFPB filed a Notice of Charges (essentially an administrative complaint) against Integrity Advance, LLC and its CEO and president, James R. Carnes. The Notice of Charges, which was made public last week, alleges that from May 15, 2008 through December 2012, Integrity Advance and Carnes engaged in unfair and deceptive conduct, and that Integrity Advance also committed violations of the Truth in Lending Act (TILA) and the Electronic Funds Transfer Act (EFTA) in the origination of online payday loans.

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