Archive: November 2011

1
CFPB to Provide Early Warning Notice of Potential Enforcement Actions
2
Risky Business: CFPB’s New Consumer Risk Assessment Process
3
CFPB Announces “Know Before You Owe” for Student Loans
4
The CFPB Mortgage Servicing Examination Procedures Fail to Harmonize – Isn’t it Ironic?
5
When Trying Title Becomes Trying: The Impact of Bevilacqua v. Rodriguez on Massachusetts Foreclosure Law

CFPB to Provide Early Warning Notice of Potential Enforcement Actions

By: Kathryn M. Baugher

On November 7, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau unveiled a process designed to warn individuals and companies of possible enforcement actions against them. At its discretion, the Bureau may provide an Early Warning Notice and an opportunity to respond before deciding whether to pursue an enforcement action. This process is not required by law, however, and the CFPB may decide not to provide notice in certain cases, such as when the Bureau’s Office of Enforcement believes that prompt action is necessary. Read More

Risky Business: CFPB’s New Consumer Risk Assessment Process

By: David L. Beam, Rebecca Lobenherz, Stephanie C. Robinson

Those who have been concerned about the expansive powers of the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB” or the “Bureau”) should ready themselves for the risk assessment reviews that the Bureau is about to initiate. The CFPB recently released the first edition of its Supervision and Examination Manual (“Examination Manual”), which provides an overview of the Bureau’s supervision planning process and details the Bureau’s examination procedures. A key component of the Examination Manual is the CFPB’s Consumer Risk Assessment process, which evaluates supervised entities based on the amount of risk their activities pose to consumers, identifies sources of risk, and assesses the quality of risk controls put in place by the supervised entities.

To view the complete alert online, click here.

CFPB Announces “Know Before You Owe” for Student Loans

By: Kathryn Baugher

The CFPB is expanding its “Know Before You Owe” initiative to cover student loans. Since “Know Before You Owe” began last May, the CFPB has asked the public for input on a variety of draft mortgage disclosure forms. Now the CFPB is working with the Department of Education to gather feedback on a sample financial aid offer form. The Department of Education, as required by the Higher Education Opportunity Act, plans to publish a model form that schools can use to communicate financial aid offers to students. Read More

The CFPB Mortgage Servicing Examination Procedures Fail to Harmonize – Isn’t it Ironic?

By: Jonathan D. Jaffe, Steven M. Kaplan, David I. Monteiro, David A. Tallman

The Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (the “Bureau” or the “CFPB”) was designed to provide a single, integrated federal approach to consumer financial protection. But with the October 13, 2011, release of its new Mortgage Servicing Examination Procedures (the “Procedures”), the CFPB appears to leave it up to scores of individual examiners to decide in their subjective judgment whether a company’s loan servicing practices raise “unfair, deceptive, or abusive acts or practices” (“UDAAP”) concerns. A federal government that is supposed to sing in one voice has not yet harmonized its employees.

To view the complete alert online, click here.

When Trying Title Becomes Trying: The Impact of Bevilacqua v. Rodriguez on Massachusetts Foreclosure Law

By: R. Bruce Allensworth, Andrew C. Glass, Roger L. Smerage

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (“SJC”) has ruled that Massachusetts property owners may lack standing to establish title to their property where there is a void foreclosure sale in the chain of title. The Massachusetts “try title” statute permits a holder of “record title” in possession of property to file a petition to force adverse claimants to defend their purported interest in the property. In Bevilacqua v. Rodriguez, the SJC held that a third-party purchaser of foreclosed property did not hold record title where no assignment of mortgage to the foreclosing entity had occurred at the time of foreclosure. Absent such an assignment, the foreclosure sale was invalid, and the foreclosing entity had nothing to convey to the third-party purchaser. Taking nothing from the foreclosing entity, the third-party purchaser lacked standing to maintain a try title action against the original mortgagor. Nonetheless, the scope of the ruling is likely limited to Massachusetts and jurisdictions where a mortgagee or its assigns must initiate foreclosure and where the party bringing the foreclosure action did not obtain an assignment of the mortgage until after the commencement of the foreclosure process. Moreover, because the Bevilacqua decision simply applies the law as already articulated by the SJC in its January 2011 U.S. Bank, N.A. v. Ibanez  opinion, its impact on current and ongoing foreclosure practices appears limited. Massachusetts foreclosure attorneys are likely to have already altered their assignment practices in light of Ibanez.

To view the complete alert online, click here.

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